Dueling Personalities: The Psychology of the Hamilton-Burr Conflict

Note: Most of the words in this post are direct or slightly modified excerpts from the brilliant lyrics written by Lin-Manuel Miranda for the musical, Hamilton. This analysis is based on the portrayals of Burr and Hamilton in the musical.

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PSYCHOLOGICAL REPORT

Names: Aaron Burr, Alexander Hamilton
Ages: 48 (Burr), 47 (Hamilton)
Education: Bachelor’s degree from College of New Jersey/Princeton; theological, military, and legal training (Burr), Bachelor’s degree from King’s College/Columbia; military & legal training (Hamilton)
Date of Session: July 10, 1804
Therapists: Katie Gordon, Ph.D., Brandon Saxton, M.S.

Presenting Problem
Alexander Hamilton’s wife, Eliza, grew concerned when he said that he “had an early meeting out of town.” Hamilton’s disagreement with his long-time frenemy, Aaron Burr, had recently escalated, and she was suspicious that this meeting might actually be a duel. She insisted that Hamilton and Burr attend a therapy session to resolve their conflict peacefully. Eliza told him that she felt helpless after losing their son in a duel and that he owed it to her after burning her with the whole Reynolds Pamphlet ordeal. Hamilton couldn’t say no to this.

We started the session by walking up to the two men in the waiting room and asking one of them, “Pardon me, are you Aaron Burr, sir?” To which he responded, “Alexander Hamilton. My name is Alexander Hamilton.” After getting clarity on who was who, we introduced ourselves and invited them back to our office to further assess the problem. During the interview, we did not find Burr to be forthcoming on any particular stance. He’d glance off, obfuscate, and dance. Meanwhile, Hamilton did not equivocate on his opinion; he wore it on his sleeve.

Apparently, the heart of the conflict was that Burr wanted desperately to be in “the room where it happens” and blamed Hamilton for his losses in the Presidential election of 1800 and the New York Governor election in 1804. Specifically, Burr believed that Hamilton’s public attacks on his character swayed these elections. Hamilton’s criticisms of Burr included saying that he had no principles and acted in an opportunistic, self-interested fashion. He called him “amoral” and a “dangerous disgrace.”

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History
Burr’s grandfather was a fire and brimstone preacher; his mother was a genius; his father commanded respect. Tragically, both of his parents died when he was a young boy. When asked how he managed without them, he replied, “I’m a trust fund baby, you can trust me.” He was raised by relatives and reaped the benefits of their wealth, including access to an excellent education and connections with powerful people. After graduating in two years from college, he fought in the Revolutionary War. He was romantically involved with a married woman named Theodosia, whose husband was fighting on the British side in Georgia. Ultimately, he and Theodosia married (after her husband died) and had a daughter, who he referred to as “Dear Theodosia.” Burr practiced law and was active in politics as a Senator and Attorney General. The highest office he held was the Vice President of the United States from 1801-1805. The fact that Burr was born into financial and societal privilege may have influenced his life philosophy to wait patiently for opportunities to arise before acting on them. By working hard and avoiding huge public errors, he believed he could maintain the status and wealth he was born into and use them as a foundation to achieve even greater political power.

Hamilton presented as a bastard, orphan, son of a whore and Scotsman, dropped in the middle of a forgotten spot in the Caribbean by providence impoverished and squalor who grew up to be a hero and a scholar. When he was 10, his father split, full of it, debt-ridden; two years later, he and his mother were bed-ridden, half-dead sittin’in their own sick, the scent thick. Hamilton got better but his mother went quick. He moved in with a cousin, who died by suicide. Left to fend for himself, he got a job for his late mother’s landlord trading sugar cane and rum and all the things he couldn’t afford. By 14, he was in charge of a Trading Charter. Then, a hurricane came, and devastation reigned. He wrote a letter describing the hurricane’s impact, and it was so beautifully stated, that the people in his town took up a collection to send him to the mainland to get an education and nurture his talents. Like Burr, Hamilton graduated from college, fought in the Revolutionary War (Hamilton served as Washington’s right-hand man), practiced law, and was active in politics as the first Secretary of Treasury for the United States. He married Eliza Schuyler, after meeting her at a winter’s ball, and they had eight children together. Their oldest son, Philip, died at a young age in a duel. The fact that Hamilton was born into a stigmatized position at the time (i.e., being born out of wedlock) and into poverty may have influenced his life philosophy to persistently pursue his dreams without inhibition. By fervently seeking out chances to ascend in society and working non-stop, he believed he could attain status, wealth, and political power only by working a lot harder than others, by being a lot smarter than others, and by being more of a self-starter than others.

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Diagnostic Impressions
After an evaluation, we concluded that while Burr and Hamilton share many qualities, the areas where they differ led them to the point where they were considering a duel. An analysis of these overlapping and divergent qualities are depicted in the Venn diagram below:

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Treatment Recommendations
To our knowledge, there are not any evidence-based strategies for duel prevention. However, we intervened by explaining to Burr and Hamilton that participating in a duel would negatively impact them and interfere with their personal goals. We told Burr that killing Hamilton would hinder his ability to be in the room where it happens. We hoped that this would motivate him to find an alternative approach to handling the conflict. Similarly, we told Hamilton that duel participation would increase the likelihood that he would actually “run out of time” before establishing the legacy he desired, and we reminded him,”history has its eyes on you.”

We experienced resistance from Burr, who argued that he looked back on where he failed, and in every place he checked, the only common thread was Hamilton’s disrespect. His overwhelming blame of Hamilton for all of his thwarted plans formed a significant obstacle to duel dissuasion.

Similarly, Hamilton wasn’t willing to decline the duel invitation. Hamilton’s personality rarely involved backing down from positions or challenges. Indeed, when Burr asked him for an apology, Hamilton responded with, “Burr, your grievance is legitimate. I stand by what I said, every bit of it. You stand only for yourself. It’s what you do. I can’t apologize because it’s true.”

To this, Burr replied, “Then stand, Alexander. Weehawken. Dawn. Guns drawn.”

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Status at Follow-up
Burr shot Hamilton in a duel the day following our session, and Hamilton died the day after that. Hamilton’s legacy was planting seeds in a garden he’d never get to see. and he is remembered as a ten-dollar founding father, hero, and a scholar. Meanwhile, Burr became the villain in your history books. When Burr was asked if he had any regrets, he said that he now understood that “the world was wide enough for both Hamilton and me.” We would have strongly preferred that Burr had that revelation before killing Hamilton.

THE GORDON/SAXTON TEST

  1. Was the portrayal of mental illness accurate?

Lin-Manuel Miranda was not portraying characters with mental disorders. However, his depictions of Burr and Hamilton appear both psychologically and mostly historically accurate. Miranda went to great lengths to examine historical records and consult with historical experts when he created Hamilton. He took some artistic liberty for the sake of storytelling and this approach resulted in fascinating, relatable characters.

  1. Was the character struggling with mental health issues depicted with compassion?

Miranda depicted his characters with great compassion. Burr is generally remembered as a villain and Hamilton as a hero, but Miranda went beyond that simple dichotomy of good versus evil and presented two realistic characters with both redeeming and irritating qualities.

Overall rating: On a scale of Darwin Award to EGOT, we rate the Hamilton depictions of Burr and Hamilton as EGOT!

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The Room Where It’s Happening is an awesome Hamilton fan podcast! You can check it out here.

If you’d like to read 10 Hamilton Quotes for Therapists, you can click here.

Ridin’ along with “Mad” Max Rockatansky

PSYCHOLOGICAL REPORT

Name: “Mad” Max Rockatansky
Date of Birth: Pre-nuclear apocalypse
Occupation: MFP Pursuit Officer (former)
Road Warrior (current)
Date of Initial Interview: 05/5/2015
Date of Report: 02/01/2017
Therapists: Brandon Saxton, M.S., Katie Gordon, Ph.D.

NOTE: Some information in this report contains chronological gaps and inconsistencies. This information was collected via diagnostic interview (i.e., watching the films, playing the game, and reading the graphic novel) while roaring through the wasteland in Max’s V8 Interceptor: Pursuit Special being pursued by raiders from Gastown. This made for a difficult intake session…

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Presenting Problem:
Max was self-referred to therapy with the goal of reducing his distress levels. After the loss of his family and some other traumatic experiences, Max reported having intrusive thoughts and flashbacks that interfered with his everyday functioning.

Family History:
Max did not disclose much about about his childhood. He mostly responded with grunts when asked about it. In his previous position as a police officer, Max was a highly-skilled driver who often engaged criminals in high-speed chases on the open road. Realizing that he was losing himself in his work, Max retired and moved to the country with his family. Unfortunately, his past followed him. A gang leader took revenge on Max by killing his wife and son in front of him, and he was reduced to a shell of his former self. As a result, he left his life completely behind and became a road warrior in the wasteland.

Occupational History:
Max commandeered the V8 Interceptor: Pursuit Special and his old police gear. He was able to locate and take revenge on each of the gang members who took his family from him. For three years after, Max traveled the wasteland with a dog aptly named Dog. Max moved into his car, which was heavily modified for long distance travel. While scavenging, Max was nearly ambushed by a gyrocopter pilot. Turning the ambush around, Max forced the pilot to bring him to a nearby compound where he could obtain fuel.

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Once there, Max saved people who were under attack with the hope of being rewarded with fuel. Instead, they detained Max and his car. Eventually, Max made a deal with their leader, offering to retrieve a vehicle that they could use to transport gasoline away from the compound in exchange for his car and fuel. After delivering on his end of the deal, Max left the compound. However, he did not make it very far before being run down by Lord Humongous’s gang. Fortunately, he was saved by the gyrocopter pilot. After being nursed back to health, Max agreed to help the people in the compound escape with gasoline. He lead the escape in the tanker. It was then that Max learned that the tanker was filled with sand, and that it was all a ruse to get the hidden fuel away in smaller vehicles.

Many years later, Max was still wandering the wasteland and found his way to Bartertown. Max was forced into entering the Thunderdome, Bartertown’s gladiatorial arena, where he was pitted against Master Blaster. Max was could not bring himself to kill his opponent, who was an innocent man with a disability.

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Because he did not kill Master, Max had to “face the Wheel.” With the Wheel of Fortune deciding his fate, Max was sent into the wasteland to die. Max was saved by a tribe of young children who believed he was their hero of prophecy. Max returned to Bartertown to find Master,  who he believed could help the children. He fled Bartertown with Master in tow, which lead to a terrible road war. Eventually, Master and the tribe of children escaped.

Some time following these events, Max was again run off the road and taken captive. This time, Immortan Joe and his war boys took Max to use him as a “blood bag.” Finding his blood being drained while strapped to the front of a car racing across the dessert, Max was able to escape while the war boys pursued Furiosa, one of Immortan Joe’s Imperators.

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Max joined with Furiosa who was fleeing the warlord dictator, Immortan Joe, with his Wives. Max and Furiosa were ultimately able to escape with the Wives and find Furiosa’s old clan. Furiosa learned that The Green Place that she had been seeking was no longer there. Furiosa decided to take everyone and flee across the wasteland instead. Max, with his own supplies, went in the opposite direction.

Then, Max experienced a flashback of a young girl. This prompted him to go back to Furiosa and her group. He believed that their best bet for a safe home was to take the Citadel from Immortan Joe while his forces were out pursuing them. After yet another destructive road war, Max, Furiosa, and the rest were able to defeat Immortan Joe and his army. They returned to the Citadel as heroes and liberators. However, Max left them behind to continue his life alone.

Psychiatric/Medical History:
Max denied any history of psychiatric treatment. With regard to medical history, Max suffered an injury after being shot in the leg and subsequently wore a leg brace.

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Assessment & Diagnostic Impressions
Max’s symptoms appear to be best captured by a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – 5th Edition.

As detailed previously, Max has experienced a variety of traumatic events (defined by the DSM-5 as exposure to actual or threatened death, serious injury, or sexual violence). Max’s symptoms primarily seem to be related to the people he has been unable to save throughout his life. For example, Max appears to experience multiple intrusive symptoms in Mad Max: Fury Road. These flashbacks consist of a young girl asking Max for help. They appear to be very distressing. Beyond that, Max also appears to engage in avoidance of situations that remind him of the traumatic events. Specifically, after losing his family, Max is seen refusing to get close to others again and again. This is particularly worth mentioning as solitude in the wasteland almost always means death. Additionally, following the loss of his family, Max appears to have negative changes to his thoughts and moods. He goes from being a light-hearted, family man to a dark killer. His life goal becomes revenge. Additionally, Max appears to have suffered from changes in his arousal and reactivity (e.g., irritable mood, angry outbursts, etc.). Max is always on alert for danger. He rarely falls into a trap (such as the one set by the gyrocopter pilot) and is usually on edge.

Treatment Recommendations
In summary, Max appears to meet full diagnostic criteria for PTSD. Fortunately, evidence-based treatments are available. Such treatments include therapist-guided processing of traumas (e.g., Cognitive Processing Therapy, Prolonged Exposure) and decreasing unhealthy behavioral patterns without focusing directly on the trauma (e.g., Present-Centered Therapy).

THE GORDON/SAXTON TEST

  1. Was the portrayal of mental illness accurate?
    The changes that Max undergoes after losing his family do appear to be within the realm of possibility for someone experiencing such trauma. Max loses his sense of his former self, exhibits extreme negative affect, avoids getting close to others, and experiences many reminders of those he has lost.
  2. Was the character struggling with mental health issues depicted with compassion?
    Overall, Max was not written specifically to depict mental health issues. That being said, he does appear to be a character who, despite intense trauma, is able to rise above and help those in need. Additionally, Max refuses to harm Blaster, of Master Blaster, while battling in the Thunderdome, as Blaster appears to have a developmental disability. So, not only is Max depicted with some compassion, he also displays some. Nice work, George Miller.

Overall rating:
Overall, we rate Mad Max as SHINY AND CHROME! That is, totally awesome. Max is a complex character. He is continually seen trying to shun connections with others, often acting as if he only cares about his own safety and survival. Despite this, he always ends up being guided by his moral compass. Time and time again, we see Max come to the aid of those in need, never able to completely turn away.

We joined The Geek Therapy Podcast Network!

We have exciting news! We joined The Geek Therapy Podcast Network, which hosts 4 other shows: Geek Therapy (about the potential benefits of comics, games, TV shows, and movies), PsychTech (exploring the human side of technology), Headshots (about psychology and gaming), and Rolling for Change (about the educational and therapeutic side of gaming). We highly recommend all of these shows. They’re high quality, thoughtful, and super-fun to listen to! gtc

 

Wicked Smart Will Hunting

Name: Will Hunting
Age: 20
Education: Some high school
Occupation: Between jobs
Date of Report: December 5, 1997
Therapists: Katie Gordon, Ph.D., Brandon T. Saxton, M.S.

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Presenting Problem
Will was punching a man who had bullied him in kindergarten when three police officers showed up and tried to stop him. As they pulled Will away, he responded by kicking one of them. After Will appeared in court for this incident, the judge ordered a psychological evaluation. When Will arrived at our office, he made it clear that he was disinterested in meeting with us. He told us that he had read our website and listened to our podcast before coming in, and he was not impressed. He then lit a cigarette and told us to “go #$%&” ourselves. After being reminded that his timely release from jail was dependent on his cooperation with our evaluation, he said, “I’m pumped. Let the healing begin!”

Family/Social History
Will did not want to share his history with us, but we were able to obtain information from medical and court records. We learned that Will was an only child whose parents died when he was a young boy. He was then placed in the foster care system and was removed from three homes due to severe physical abuse (e.g., being stabbed with a knife and burned with cigarettes). Tragically, these early childhood experiences disrupted Will’s ability to form healthy attachments and trust people. He also developed a persistent fear that people would abandon him once they knew the truth about his past.

According to one of Will’s previous therapist’s notes, Will tended to act in an arrogant, cocky manner to push people away and protect himself from getting hurt. There were some exceptions to this pattern, however. Will had a close group of friends (including his best friend, Chucky) that he grew up with in South Boston (“Southie”). They spent time together driving around, watching local little league games, and hanging out at bars. He described them as “good guys” and “loyal.”

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Educational/Employment History
Will dropped out of high school due to disinterest, but actively pursued self-education through reading materials on a wide range of topics including history, chemistry, art, physics, and literature. He also chose to work as a janitor at MIT in order to gain more exposure to advanced mathematics. Based on Will’s verbalization and impressive knowledge, he appeared to have superior intellectual functioning. After explaining his educational history to us, Will stood up and looked at the diplomas and degrees on our walls and said, “You wasted $150,000 on an education you could’ve got for $1.50 in late fees at the public library.” He then made his way to our bookshelf, eyed a history book, and said, “If you want to read a real history book, read Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States. That book will #$%&ing knock you on your #$%.” We thanked him for the advice and turned to his employment history, which consisted of working a string of different jobs including custodial work and construction.

Legal History
Will’s criminal records revealed the following charges: Assault (June, 1993; September, 1993), Grand Theft Auto*(February, 1994), Impersonating a Police Officer (January, 1995), Mayhem, Theft, and Resisting Arrest (dates unknown).

*He had this charge dropped by arguing that it fit within Free Property Rights of Horse and Carriage from 1798.

Diagnostic Impressions & Treatment Recommendations
Based on his presentation and behavior in Good Will Hunting (available on Netflix!), we decided to evaluate Will for antisocial personality disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While he exhibited some PTSD symptoms in response to severe childhood abuse (e.g., persistent and exaggerated negative beliefs about oneself, others, or the world), he did not appear to meet full diagnostic criteria for the disorder (e.g., he did not appear to exhibit signs of recurrent, intrusive memories of the trauma).

According to the DSM-5, antisocial personality disorder is characterized by a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others, occurring since age 15. Will clearly met at least 4 of the 7 criteria (3 are required for this diagnosis): 1) failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors, as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest (see legal history section), 2) deceitfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning others for personal profit or pleasure (e.g., lied about having 12 older brothers: Marky, Ricky, Danny, Terry, Mikey, Davey, Timmy, Joey, Robby, Johnny, and Brian; had Chucky pretend to be him during a job interview), 3) irritability or aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults (see presenting problem and legal history sections), and 4) consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain consistent work behavior or honor financial obligations (he quit at least two jobs without providing notice to his employers). While we can’t be completely certain that some of these behaviors were present by age 15, it seems reasonable to suspect that in light of his criminal record dating back to age 16.

A subset of individuals with antisocial personality disorder also exhibit psychopathic traits, including extreme callousness with regard to other people’s feelings. While Will displayed antisocial patterns, including criminal behavior, he did not appear to lack in conscience or concern for others. He experienced genuine and deep feelings for Skylar (a woman he dated) and his friends from Southie. Therefore, Will did not appear to be psychopathic. That is important for treatment planning, because there is evidence that individuals with psychopathy do not tend to improve or actually become worse with therapeutic intervention. Treatment research on antisocial personality disorder has not clearly identified effective treatments for this disorder. Most effective treatments for these types of behaviors target adolescents in family-focused, multicomponent treatments, which draws attention to the importance of early intervention for antisocial behavior.

Though he did not appear to meet criteria for PTSD, many of Will’s problems likely stem from, or were exacerbated by, tragic and traumatic childhood events. Therefore, he may benefit from a therapeutic approach that addresses the negative impact of these experiences while teaching him healthy emotional coping and behavioral strategies. Because this particular approach has not been scientifically-tested, his therapist should regularly monitor Will to ensure that he is receiving benefit from it. If he is not improving or becoming worse, this approach should be discontinued. Will has a number of strengths including his insight, knowledge, and desire for interpersonal connections – all which suggest that he may benefit from therapy, if he is willing to participate in it.

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Status at Follow-up
We contacted Will’s therapist, Sean Maguire, to follow-up on his status. Sean informed us that their therapy had a rough start, but they ultimately formed a strong, meaningful rapport and made substantial progress. Sean said that he last heard from Will through a letter that said he “had to see about a girl,” meaning that he had finally left his comfort zone in Southie and went to California so that he could continue his relationship with Skylar. We viewed this as a hopeful sign of progress for Will.

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THE GORDON/SAXTON TEST

  1. Was the portrayal of mental illness accurate?

Some aspects of antisocial personality disorder were accurate, as specified above. Will’s intellect is atypically high, and that fact is recognized with the fictional world of the movie.

  1. Was the character struggling with mental health issues depicted with compassion?

Yes, Will was written and portrayed as a nuanced and sympathetic character who effectively evoked compassion.

Overall rating:
On a scale of not liking them apples to very much liking them apples, we love them apples.

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Killing Time with Kelly Kapoor

PSYCHOLOGICAL REPORT

Name: Kelly R. Kapoor
Date of Birth: February 5, 1980
Education: High school diploma
Employment: Customer Service Representative, Dunder Mifflin, Scranton (current)
Date of Initial Interview: March 24, 2010
Date of Report: May 16, 2013
Therapists: Katie Gordon, Ph.D., Brandon Saxton, M.S.

Presenting Problem
Kelly Kapoor presented as a 30-year-old woman who was referred for treatment by her on-again/off-again romantic partner, Ryan Howard. Ryan was not very friendly or clear about why he was dropping Kelly off at our office. He kind of just ushered her in, while she was speaking to him rapidly about the latest pop culture drama, and then quickly left the building.

History
Listen; to whoever reads this report, we’ll be honest. It was very hard for us to get any relevant history from Kelly during this interview…we learned that she has three living sisters and one who passed away. She also mentioned that she spent a year in a juvenile detention center for stealing her ex-boyfriend’s father’s boat.

The rest of the interview covered an incredible range of information on various celebrities’ lives. At one point, after asking more about her life, she explained that she had so much to tell us about and then proceeded to report that Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie had a baby that they named Shiloh. We reiterated our question asking for more information about her life, and she replied that she had just told us more. This example is representative of what the entire interview was like.

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Diagnostic Impressions
All assessment information was gleaned from behavioral observations (i.e., watching The Office more times than one would think is humanly possible – like, probably thousands of times between the two of us). It appeared that Kelly’s presenting problem was best captured by a diagnosis of histrionic personality disorder, which is “a pervasive pattern of excessive emotionality and attention-seeking.” Specifically, she met criteria for 5 of 8 symptoms of histrionic personality disorder: 1) is uncomfortable in situations in which he or she is not the center of attention (e.g., Kelly’s new year’s resolution was “to get more attention by any means necessary”); 2) interaction with others is often characterized by inappropriate sexually seductive or provocative behavior (e.g., she asked a co-worker if she should seduce her new boss, Charles Miner, shortly after meeting him; she started a musical duo with co-worker, Erin, that is ironically called Subtle Sexuality); 3) shows self-dramatization, theatricality, and exaggerated expression of emotion (e.g., in an effort to get her ex-boyfriend and boss, Ryan, to pay attention to her, she asks him, “How dare you?” in the middle of a work meeting that he is conducting and also faked a pregnancy, when deciding between getting back together with Ryan and staying with her boyfriend Ravi, she said, “Ravi makes me incredibly happy. And Ryan puts me through so much drama. So, I guess I just have to decide which of those is more important to me”); 4) is suggestible (i.e., is easily influenced by others or circumstances; e.g., Dwight convinces Kelly to apply for an executive training program to suit his own needs, describing her as a “malleable simpleton who can be bought for a few fashion magazines”); and 5) considers relationships to be more intimate than they actually are (she overestimates the strength of her romantic relationships with Ryan and Darryl, as well as the strength of her friendship with Pam – e.g., she asks Pam if she can be her bridesmaid).

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Treatment Recommendations
Currently, there are not any well-established treatments for histrionic personality disorder that have been tested in large randomized clinical trials. Approaches that have been used effectively include cognitive therapy focused on thoughts and behaviors that emphasize assertiveness and sharing attention with others over theatricality and self-centeredness in interpersonal interactions.

Status at Termination
The last we saw of Kelly was at Dwight and Angela’s wedding. Ryan intentionally induced an allergic reaction in his child, so that Kelly’s husband, Ravi (a pediatrician), would focus on the child’s medical needs, while Kelly and Ryan ran off together. Needless to say, this does not reflect a ton of therapeutic progress or serve as a great prognostic sign for things to come.

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THE GORDON/SAXTON TEST

  1. Was the portrayal of mental illness accurate?

Though it is unlikely that Kelly was purposely designed as a character with histrionic personality disorder, the depiction nonetheless portrays some of the symptoms accurately. However, the symptoms are exaggerated, at times, for comedic effect.

  1. Was the character with mental health issues depicted with compassion?

Kelly was not particularly characterized in a way that elicits compassion. She typically appears to be viewed as annoying and shallow by her co-workers.

Overall ratingIf this depiction of histrionic personality disorder in Kelly Kapoor were to receive a Dundie, it would be the Jenna Maroney-of-30-Rockish Dundie.

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