Suicide Prevention Information & Resources

This week involved a lot of heartbreaking suicide-related news. We tragically lost Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain to suicide. We also learned that U.S. suicide rates increased substantially over the past several years. If you want to learn and do more to prevent suicide, we want to help you out by linking to some good sources. We hope you find them useful.

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If you need help:

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Trans Lifeline

The Trevor Project (for LGTBQ+ youth)

Veterans Crisis Line

Find a Therapist

Find a Support Group for People Who Have Lost Someone to Suicide

Listen to a Hopeful Music Playlist Made by College Students

Research-Supported Treatments for Adults

Research-Supported Treatments for Children

Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy by David Burns

How to help others:

Warning Signs

How to Help Someone Who is Suicidal

Take a Mental Health First Aid Training Course

Get involved:

Call Your Representatives and Tell Them to Prioritize Policies linked to Suicide Prevention (e.g., access to quality healthcare, funding for research)

Participate in an Out of Darkness Community Walk

For information:

Suicide Statistics

Suicide Prevention Social Media Chat

Live Through This Photo Project

Wil Wheaton Essay about Mental Health

Rudy Caseres, Mental Health Advocate

Robert Vore, Mental Health Advocate

It Gets Better Project

Why People Die by Suicide by Thomas Joiner

Myths about Suicide by Thomas Joiner

Guns and Suicide by Michael Anestis

Cracked Not Broken by Kevin Hines

Speaking of Suicide by Stacey Freedenthal

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What Can We Learn from Batman about Being a Therapist?

Hi everyone, Brandon here. Come on in, have a seat. I know what you’re thinking… “Hey Jedi Counsel, this is not one of the classic psychological evaluations about one of my favorite, beloved fictional characters that I’ve come to expect every month or so! What gives?” Well, let me tell you what gives, friend. This is my fifth year of graduate school and last semester at North Dakota State University. This summer I will begin the final year of my Ph.D., which will consist of a full time, yearlong clinical position at a non-profit community mental health clinic. I’m entering a time of pretty significant personal change. I started at NDSU during my undergraduate. The university and my status as a student have been a central part of my identity for a very long time. I’ve been reflecting a lot about the transition out of this role and into my new role as a full-time clinician. Because this, I started thinking a lot about my favorite fictional character and the lessons I can take from him to help guide me in my clinical work. To that end, I asked my ever-accommodating co-host/blogger if we could mix it up this month. Please get comfortable as I take you through a journey of the lessons I’ve learned from Batman that I believe could apply to being a good therapist.

Lesson 1: Do what is right, even if it is not always easy.

“It has nothing to do with easy. It’s about doing what’s right because it’s right. That’s the only reason you need.” – Batman

When Bruce Wayne was very young, he witnessed the murder of his parents. This was a life-altering event for Bruce that would dramatically change the trajectory of his life. In response to this, he made it his mission to do whatever he could to prevent other people from having the same experience that he had. Now, depending on the nature of the event, available social support, and the overall psychological make-up of an individual, people can respond to trauma in many ways. This is just the way Bruce Wayne responded (though it isn’t clear that he ever emotionally recovered from the loss of his parents, see here for more info). It’s clear this wasn’t easy for him, though. He could have had a perfectly relaxing life, relying on his fortunes to live comfortably and happily for all his days. He has a mansion and cars and even a butler. He had it made in the shade. Instead he chose to do what he felt was right and become Batman. Years of study and training (sound familiar?), self-sacrifice, and a rough road were the rewards Batman got. Nevertheless, he continued to move forward to help make the world a little bit better for the people in his city.

To me, this applies directly to clinical work. We simply have to do what is right. Specifically, we are expected to act in accordance to the ethical standards prescribed to us (click here to see the wiki that I helped to write that outlines the APA Ethics Code!). At times, these situations aren’t always easy. Mandated reporting is an example. You might have a strong therapeutic relationship with a client. You could feel like you’re really making progress. But if you learn about an incident or behavior that you’re required to report, it has to happen (note: the client would be informed of this during the informed consent for treatment). Other examples include avoiding, or if necessary, navigating dual-relationships, maintaining confidentiality, respecting client autonomy, identifying and practicing within your competency areas, maintaining thorough documentation, and sticking to evidenced-based treatments and assessments. These are just a few of the many examples where clinicians might face challenging situations. It’s important that we rely on our ethical codes to do what is right in the same way that Batman relies on his own personal moral code to do what is right in his war on crime.

Lesson 2: Stand up for those who might not be able to stand up for themselves.

“I’ll be standing where I belong. Between you and the people of Gotham.” – Bruce Wayne, Batman Begins (2005)

The center of Batman’s mission is doing all he can to prevent anyone from experiencing what he experienced as a child. This theme is consistent throughout the many stories of Batman across the various mediums. For example, in the recent Batman comic series authored by Tom King, Batman takes control of an airplane that is going to crash into Gotham City. He intends to divert the plan and crash with it. Another example is in Nolan’s The Dark Knight (2009), in the end Batman takes the blame for everything Harvey Dent did so that the people still have someone to look up to. In the 2015 video game, Arkham Knight, Batman sacrifices himself to save the city from Scarecrow’s chemical attack. It seems like almost every Batman story has an element of him taking to hit, pain, or blame so that someone else can be spared.

To me this translates to engaging in advocacy work. As a field, Clinical Psychology has not always done a good job advocating for those who may need it. Looking back at the history of how the LGBTQ+ communities were treated within our field is a good example of this (see our Jedi Counsel episode for a primer on this and a list of further resources). I believe that people should advocate for whatever social justice rights that lead to the betterment of others that they are comfortable with. Due to our clinical training, our expertise is in mental health. So one potential area of professional advocacy falls clearly in that realm. One example is challenging the claims that failures in our mental health systems are the cause of violence (see here for a brief fact-sheet outlining the research between mental health and violence). Another example might be disseminating mental health resources so individuals know where to get help (we just gave a talk related to this recently on campus!) Or it might be just doing what you can in your day to day life to reduce mental health stigma which can sometimes take the voice from others and keep them from getting help they might need. Batman makes it a point to stick up for people who might be going through tough times and may not have a voice or way of defending themselves. Through our expertise and clinical work, we have the opportunity to do the same.

Lesson 3: You don’t have to be a superhero to make a difference.

“A hero can be anyone. Even a man doing something as simple and reassuring as putting a coat around a young boy’s shoulders to let him know that the world hadn’t ended.” – Bruce Wayne, The Dark Knight Rises (2012)

In The Dark Knight Rises, Batman tells Jim Gordon how he was a hero to him when he was younger and coping with the loss of his parents. We see this role reversed many times throughout several Batman stories. When many people think of Batman, they think of the rough and tough dude in a suit who punches the baddies and saves the day. However, for folks who have had the good fortune to dig deeper into the character through the various comic book series or animated depictions, we see a much softer side of Batman from time to time. A perfect example of this can see seen in the Justice League cartoon. Amanda Waller wants to destroy a young girl who has developed terrible powers. Instead of doing so, Batman goes and sits with the young girl on a swing set and holds her hand while she dies as a result of her powers. In Batman, we have a character who has no super-powers at all but still manages to go toe-to-toe with aliens, Amazons, and gods. Despite that, he never forgets what it means to be a hero for him.

For clinical work, it’s important for each of us to remember the impact that we can have. It is a fairly safe assumption to assume that most people go into mental health because they want to help others. However, between a lot of schooling, navigating licensure, tough hours, large caseloads, challenging clients, difficulties in insurance reimbursement, and the many, many other things involved in clinical work, it can sometimes be easy to lose sight of what your initial goal was. It can be helpful from time to time to reframe things and remind oneself what an honor it is that you have the opportunity to step into these peoples’ lives and help them get to a better place. Just by meeting with you, clients can learn new skills, get regular social interaction, learn more about what they are experiencing through psychoeducation, and receive validation through normalization that others are likely struggling with the same disorder or challenges that they are. Any one of those benefits alone can really mean something to someone who is struggling. For young Bruce Wayne, having Jim Gordon hang a coat on his shoulders was everything in the world for him. For your clients, you can serve the same role by simply being collaborative in providing an explanation for what they are experiencing, which alone can help them feel better and more hopeful (see here for a study on how careful diagnostic feedback leads to increases in positive emotions and hope).

Lesson 4: Be humble and know when to ask for help.

“The first truth of Batman… It had to be one I didn’t like to admit. The gunshots left me alone. For years I was alone in the echoing dark of that well. But something else defined the exact moment Batman was born. The First Truth of Batman… The saving grace. I was never alone. I had help.” – Bruce Wayne, The Return of Bruce Wayne

Another major theme of Batman is that despite his independent nature and desire to work alone, he always knows when he needs to ask for help. Whether it is having a side-kick, relying on Alfred, or calling in the Justice League, Batman knows when he needs back-up. Part of this is that he acknowledges his skills. For example; he can’t fly. In the Justice League animated series, there is a scene where he calls in for some air support (see here). Or in the newest Justice League (2017) film, Batman recognizes that something beyond him is coming to Earth. As such, he recruits Wonder Woman and others to join him in preventing an invasion.

For Batman, it all boils down to knowing his skills and knowing when he needs help. In clinical work, it is largely the same. We know that therapist competence is largely predictive of therapy outcomes (see here for a study related specifically to Cognitive Behavior Therapy for depression). As such, it is important to recognize when a client has a problem or requires a treatment that falls outside of your competence area. Additionally, it is important to seek support when you need it. This can be in the form of supervision when you are still developing or perhaps learning a new treatment. Another way of seeking support is through consultation. Consulting with a peer or other professional can help to illuminate problems or ideas you might have missed. Consultation can also help with treatment adherence. In fact, for Dialectical Behavior Therapy, consultation is required to ensure that all therapists are adhering to the treatment manual (see here for more details). The last way of seeking support is related to work-life balance. Take the time to recognize if you are feeling therapist burnout. It can happen. Managing work/life balance and seeking consultation and peer support or advice can help. In the end. Batman recognizes his expertise and when he needs help. In clinical work, we need to be doing the same thing.

Lesson 5: Trust the data.

“Maybe it is time we stopped trying to outsmart the truth, and let it have its day.” – Alfred Pennyworth, The Dark Knight Rises (2012)

The final lesson that we can learn from Batman is to trust the data. At his core, Batman is a detective. Many in the DC universe call him The World’s Greatest Detective. He has degrees in criminal science, forensics, computer science, chemistry, engineering, biology, physics, and advanced chemistry and technology. When he is solving a mystery, he knows to trust in the latest available science and data. Additionally, he follows the clues and data he collects along the way to figure out who is behind whatever heinous crime he is working on at that time. He tries to keep his own personal judgment or emotion out of the equation and trusts in what he can observe, quantify, and measure.

The same ideals should hold true in clinical work. When comparing clinical judgment to statistical judgment, we know that the stats are at least as good, and often times better, than our own clinical judgment (see here for a great reading on this). Looking further, there are many researchers working hard to determine what the most empirically-supported interventions and assessments are. There is a range in the level of evidence available for different treatments. We owe it to our clients to select the treatment with the greatest statistical likelihood of working for each given disorder. If no single treatment stands out statistically, or if an empirically-supported intervention is not working, then we can adopt a hypothesis testing approach to treatment. By selecting a treatment that we have reason to believe will work and testing whether it is through an appropriate outcome measure, we can continue to move forward in a data-driven manner. Just like Batman trusts the data and science before his own judgment or conclusions, we as clinicians ought to as well.

In Closing

            Are you still here? Amazing. Because that post got much longer than I ever expected. At the end of the day, Batman is a character with over 75 years of content in comics, movies, video games, television shows, and novels. He’s a character who can fit the needs we have as readers or viewers. Today, we just wanted to think about some of the ways in which Batman might help guide us in clinical work. There are a lot of amazing fictional and non-fictional individuals who can guide us in any profession or life in general. Who are some that you look up to?

Things We Liked in 2017

Here’s an (incomplete) list of things we liked in 2017! Some of the things listed came out before this year but are included because of how much we enjoyed them in 2017.

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Interacting with You!

We are so grateful for our listeners and the people that we connected with via social media. We loved talking about mental health and our shared nerdy interests with you!  Thank you for a wonderful year! We’ll work hard to create lots of high quality content for you in 2018! Special thanks go out to our Patreon patrons, to anyone who rated and reviewed us on iTunes, and to anyone who shared our stuff with a friend!

Podcasts

We are part of the Geek Therapy Podcast Network, which celebrates mental health and geek culture! You can check out the other podcasts on our network here.

My Brother My Brother and Me (which we got to see recorded live!) and SModcast made us laugh a lot.

Naming It made us think about the intersection of social justice and psychology.

Trends Like These helped us examine current events and news in greater depth.

Stay Tuned with Preet gave us insightful, diverse interviews with people interested in justice.

The Black Goat Pod helped us to think critically about the science of psychology.

The Adventure Zone brought us into an amazing Dungeons and Dragons campaign.

S-Town told a compelling story of a man who struggled with mental health issues.

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Movies

This was a great year for movies! Some of our favorites include: Wonder Woman, Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Logan, Justice League, Thor: RagnarokGet Out, Spiderman: Homecoming, & The Big Sick.

Comics

2017 also brought us many fantastic comics! Some of the ones we particularly enjoyed were: DC Rebirth Wonder Woman, Batman/The Flash: The Button, Justice League vs. Suicide Squad, a Yoga Hosers One Shot, DC Rebirth Batman, DC Rebirth Green Arrow, & DC Rebirth Batgirl and the Birds of Prey.

Games

Some of our favorite games this year were Stardew Valley and Dungeons & Dragons.

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Music

Katie loved new music from Dessa, and Brandon got really into Hamilton! We both enjoyed this song from My Crazy Ex-Girlfriend:

TV Shows

We loved some newer shows like Stranger Things, Wynonna Earp, and Rick & Morty, while rewatching older classics like Frasier and The Office.

Comedy

Katie really liked this stand-up comedy special: Hasan Minhaj: Homecoming King.

Mental Health Folks on Social Media

The Suicide Prevention Social Media (SPSM) Chat crew is awesome, and you should check out the great stuff they do!

We wish you all a very happy & healthy 2018!

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The Psychology of Rick Sanchez

“Wubba lubba dub dub!” – Rick Sanchez

PSYCHOLOGICAL REPORT

Name:  Rick Sanchez (Dimension C-137)
Current Age: 60
Ethnicity/Race: Human
Education: Unknown (on the intake forms, Rick wrote “School is a waste of time and is NOT for smart people.”)
Employment: Scientist and Inventor
Date of Initial Interview: August 6, 2017
Date of Report: September 5, 2017
Therapists: Brandon T. Saxton, M.S., Katie Gordon, Ph.D.

Presenting Problem
Rick Sanchez was referred to us by Dr. Wong, a family therapist. Dr. Wong saw Rick and his family for a session following incidents involving his grandchildren, Summer and Morty, at school. Dr. Wong referred Rick for a diagnostic assessment to provide diagnostic clarity and assist in treatment planning for Rick. She believes that Rick has some challenges to overcome in individual therapy before any effective progress can be made in their family therapy sessions.

Dr. Wong suggested that Rick has many interpersonal problems and negative views of authority, emotion, and those who he deems as less intelligent than himself. Additionally, Dr. Wong reported concern with Rick’s alcohol use.

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Family History
Rick is the father of Beth Smith, and grandfather to her two children, Summer and Morty Smith. Rick’s son-in-law is named Jerry Smith, and he is currently separated from Beth. Rick seemed hesitant to speak much about his wife, Mrs. Sanchez. It was not clear to the interviewer whether she was currently alive or deceased, though either way, Rick reported having left her when he returned to live with his daughter and grandchildren, after having been away for twenty years.

Rick reported that, “of course he likes his daughter and grandchildren” (though he stated he has proven, mathematically, that they are both pieces of sh*t). Rick seems to have a hard time balancing his love for his daughter and grandchildren and his need for independence and avoidance of emotion and connection. Although to their faces he appears distant and acts hurtful, on more than one occasion he has shown his deep affection for them (e.g., complimenting Beth’s cooking in the pilot episode, hiding the truth about the Purgenol in the candy bar Morty ate in Look Who’s Purging Now, or beating up the Devil who hurt Summer in Something Ricked This Way Comes).

One area that Rick was clear about was not liking his son-in-law, Jerry Smith. Rick stated that he does not believe that Jerry deserves to be with his daughter. Additionally, and frighteningly, Rick stated that he manipulated Beth into kicking Jerry out of their house because Jerry crossed him by suggesting the family turn Rick in to the Federation (end of Season 2, beginning of Season 3).

Educational/Employment History
Rick declined to report whether or not he had any formal education. In a previous conversation with his son-in-law, Jerry, Rick stated “I’ll tell you how I feel about school, Jerry: it’s a waste of time. Bunch of people runnin’ around bumpin’ into each other, got a guy up front says, ‘2 + 2,’ and the people in the back say, ‘4.’ Then the bell rings and they give you a carton of milk and a piece of paper that says you can go take a dump or somethin’. I mean, it’s not a place for smart people, Jerry. I know that’s not a popular opinion, but that’s my two cents on the issue.”

Rick did report, however, that he uses his natural intelligence in a variety of business ventures. One example includes his creating weapons for his associate, Krombopulos Michael, an intergalactic assassin. Another example is when the Devil opened a store in town selling cursed antiques. Rick opened another store, next door, that removed the curses and allowed the items to be kept with no risk to their owner. Rick seemed particularly proud of this endeavor – not because he saved people from the curses, but because he outsmarted the Devil himself.

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Psychiatric/Medical History
Rick denied any major medical procedures. He reported that he believes he is smart enough to handle any potential medical operations that he might need and would never let a “doctor” near his body (note: the quotes around doctor are included to represent the air quotes that Rick used when saying the word).

Rick also denied any previous psychiatric treatment, other than his session with Dr. Wong, stating that he does not respect therapy or therapists.

Diagnostic Impressions
All assessment material was collected by viewing the hit television series, Rick and Morty. Rick’s view and style of engagement with himself, the people around him, and the world around him suggests that he may be experiencing a personality disorder. The two most likely personality disorders that Rick is exhibiting are Antisocial Personality Disorder or Narcissistic Personality Disorder. Rick also appears to be experiencing impairment related to his alcohol use.

Beginning with Antisocial Personality Disorder, the individual must exhibit a pattern of disregarding the rights of others since the age of 15. However, it is not clear whether this is the case with Rick, given the information available. To meet the diagnostic criteria, three or more of seven potential criteria must be met. First, “Failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors, as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest.” Rick does this fairly consistently throughout the show. As mentioned earlier, he builds and sells weapons to the assassin, Krombopulos Michael. The second criteria that Rick meets is “Deceitfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning others for personal profit or pleasure.” In The Rickshank Redemption, Rick admits to lying and manipulating Beth to have Jerry removed from the home so he could be the undisputed patriarch and a hero. “Irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults” is met with Rick assaulting several individuals throughout the series. Rick meets “Reckless disregard for safety or self or others” by putting himself and Morty in harm’s way on almost every adventure that they go on. And lastly, “Lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another.” In the pilot episode, Rick tells Morty to shoot the soldiers chasing them, as they are just robots. When Morty realizes they are definitely not robots, Rick says: “It’s a figure of speech, Morty. They’re bureaucrats. I don’t respect them. Just keep shooting, Morty. You have no idea what prison is like here!” As such, with the information we have, and some speculation about Young Rick, Rick does appear to meet the diagnostic criteria for Antisocial Personality Disorder.

Rick also potentially meets the diagnostic criteria for a Narcissistic Personality Disorder. A Narcissistic Personality Disorder consists of “a pervasive pattern of grandiosity (in fantasy or behavior), need for admiration, and lack of empathy, beginning by early adulthood…” When assessing for this disorder, the constellation of symptoms seems to not fit perfectly. For example, when assessing the first criteria, “Has a grandiose sense of self-importance (e.g., exaggerates achievements and talents, expects to be recognized as superior without commensurate achievements,” we can start to see already this does not fit Rick. It is well established that, although Rick thinks highly of himself, he is actually the smartest individual in the universe. Rick does not appear to be “preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty, or ideal love.” Although he believes he is uniquely intelligent, this does not appear to translate to feelings that Rick is “special and unique and can only be understood, or should associate with, other special people.” He has friends from all walks of life and, although he insults and hurts them, he does love his family. Rick does, however, “require excessive admiration” (see Noob Noob from The Vindicators 3 episode.) He is clearly “interpersonally exploitative.” He does “lack empathy.” He is seen as “believing others are envious of him.” And he is depicted as “showing arrogant, haughty behaviors or attitudes,” So, technically, Rick does meet for the five required criteria for Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

However, when consulting the Differential Diagnosis section of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, we can try to differentiate some of the overlap between Antisocial Personality Disorder and Narcissistic Personality Disorder. The DSM-5 points out: “However, narcissistic personality disorder does not necessarily include characteristics of impulsivity, aggression, and deceit. In addition, individuals with antisocial personality disorder may not be as needy of the admiration and envy of others…” Individuals with Narcissistic Personality Disorder present with self-esteem that is “almost invariably very fragile” often taking the form of a “need for constant attention and admiration.” Although Rick does meet for the diagnostic criteria for Narcissistic Personality Disorder, his overall constellation of symptoms is much better captured by the Antisocial Personality Disorder, at least based on what has been depicted in the show so far. Sometimes when certain disorders have overlapping diagnostic criteria and presentations, we have to dig a bit deeper into how the disorders are conceptualized to really understand the underlying problem.

 Additionally, Rick seems to experience impairment due to his alcohol use. As such, he was assessed for an Alcohol Use Disorder. To meet the diagnostic criteria, two of the ten potential types of impairment or distress must be present within a 12-month period. The first diagnostic criteria that Rick meets is “Alcohol is often taken in larger amounts of over a longer period than was intended.” An example of this is depicted in Vindicators 3: The Return of Worldender. Throughout the trials that The Vindicators face, Rick is seen as becoming more and more intoxicated. At one point, he is too intoxicated to devise a trial for the Vindicators to face, and simply asks them to shoot basketball hoops “or something.” The next diagnostic criteria that Rick meets is “Continued alcohol use despite having persistent or recurrent social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by the effects of alcohol. There have been multiple times that Rick has threatened Morty, either directly or indirectly through his actions (e.g., Rick threatens Morty with a knife while he is intoxicated in M. Night Shamy-Aliens). Despite this, and other examples, Rick continues to drink even though it creates conflict with his family. The next diagnostic criteria that Rick meets is “Recurrent alcohol use in situations in which it is likely to be physically hazardous.” An example of this is in the pilot episode when Rick drunkenly takes Morty into this home-made spaceship to set off a neutrino bomb in order to get a fresh start. It should be noted that other diagnostic criteria may be met even if not reported. Additionally, some diagnostic criteria require recurrent instances of behavior. However, because we only see a snapshot of time in Rick’s life throughout the show, certain inferences are made about the recurrence of behavior and certain diagnostic criteria may be missed. One piece of collateral information that is relevant to Rick’s alcohol use comes from the episode Ricksy Business. Bird Person tells Morty that Rick is in great pain and uses alcohol to numb himself, explaining that Rick’s catchphrase “wubba lubba dub dub” actually means “I am in great pain. Please help me.”

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 Treatment Recommendations
In sum, Rick’s constellation of symptoms seems to be best captured by an Antisocial Personality Disorder and a comorbid Alcohol Use Disorder. It is worth noting that although Rick appears to meet for an Antisocial Personality Disorder, he does not appear to fall within the subset of those individuals who exhibits psychopathy. Specifically, despite his treatment of his family, Rick does appear to have genuine concern and affection for them and, for them alone, feel concern about how his behaviors might impact them. This is important to consider in treatment planning as there is some evidence to suggest that individuals experiencing psychopathy might actually become worse due to therapy.

Currently, we do not have any treatments for Antisocial Personality Disorder that have received strong empirical support. However, if we could have identified these behaviors in Rick as an adolescent, family-focused, multicomponent treatment would have been an option to target and hopefully change these types of behaviors. We do, however, have research suggesting that multiple types of treatment (including Motivational Enhancement Therapy, designed to strengthen desire and ability to decrease substance use) are effective for treating Alcohol Use Disorder.

Status at Termination
Rick never came to therapy again.

THE GORDON/SAXTON TEST

Was the portrayal of mental illness accurate?
Although the situations in which Rick is depicted are sometimes preposterous, the specific symptoms that he is depicted as experiencing do appear to be accurate. Rick is a very complex, multidimensional character and we are looking forward to seeing how he evolves and what we learn about him as the show goes on.

Was the character struggling with mental health issues depicted with compassion?
Rick and Morty does portray Rick with a sense of compassion. Although the show is masked with crude humor and adventure, the underlying story is about a man who is in a lot of pain and does not know how to cope with it all. In a lot of ways, the show is a metaphor for Rick himself. Under the goofs and antics, there is a really sad story waiting to be told.

Overall rating:
On a scale from “wubba lubba dub dub” to “Hit the sack, Jack!” we rate Rick and Morty as “BURGERTIME!” That is, to say, we really, really like this show. It does not set out with the intention of depicting mental health, and it is REALLY crude, but the show just works. It is a lot of fun and hits you with blasts of seriousness and emotion that all come together in a really great overall show. We definitely recommend it.

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